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Hopes for Yasmin Ahmad… July 23, 2009

Posted by drowmage in Local Filmmakers.
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I heard that Yasmin Ahmad had passed away, followed by Yasmin Ahmad had passed out – 1 minute later.

Had to be the longest 1 minute of my life.

Hope she recovers, am praying for her speedy recovery to any Gods listening right now.

More in the news:

www.thestar.com.my

www.nst.com.my

Updated: Yasmin Ahmad passed away on the 25th July, 2009. Rest in Peace, dear Yasmin. We lost an icon that day.

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Yasmin Ahmad begins ‘Muallaf’ June 6, 2007

Posted by drowmage in Local Filmmakers, Malaysian Movies, Muallaf, Yasmin Ahmad.
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I’ve been a little lazy on updating lately, plus some problems from some asinine groups of people. Here’s a little piece on Yasmin Ahmad‘s upcoming film : ‘Muallaf’. Read the blog, it has some entries on the actors and the crew she’s working with, and the location of the shoot. Plus her way of linking  director Ho Yuhang to the great Katherine Hepburn.

When I spoke to the Sharifah sisters early this year, they pointed out to me the next star of the family. Here’s a pic of her, Sharifah Aleysha, on the right, with her sister Sharifah Amani:

Sharifah Amani & Sharifah Aleysha
Sharifah Amani & Sharifah Aleysha

And because I’m such a lazy person today, I’m going to do some cut-and-paste from Yasmin’s blog for the synopsis of ‘Muallaf’ :

“20-year old Rohani and her 14-year old sister Rohana are two Malay girls on the run from their wealthy, abusive father. Finding refuge in a smaller town, their secret little world collides with that of Robert Ng, a 30-year old Catholic school teacher. The young man finds himself irresistibly drawn towards the sisters, and the extraordinary courage with which they face adversity, in a relationship that inevitably forces Robert to confront a haunting memory of his own troubled childhood. In this story of lost souls who find comfort in each other, friendship opens the window to forgiveness and a reconciliation with the past.Source

Sounds like a fascinating tale, and one that only Yasmin could pull off. Here’s to hoping it tops ‘Mukhsin‘ when it comes out. (The Drowmage lifts another glass of water – no alcohol, mind you)

What Were You Doing on ‘The 20th Day Of September’? June 6, 2007

Posted by drowmage in Amir Muhammad, Drowmage's Philosophy, Local Filmmakers, Malaysian Movies, The 20th Day of September.
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Amir Muhammad’s doing it again. He’s getting set to ruffle more feathers in the stoid set of society lions, and numerous other groups with a new film, this time about the day the phrase reformasi (reformation) was uttered not by a selected few, but by thousands in this country.

Check out the blog : http://20september.blogspot.com . It consists of a compilation of interviews done with a number of people who were watching, passing by, or part of the event that day. Mighty interesting stuff, and real informative too. Who says you don’t learn anything reading blogs?

No matter what people say, you have to totally respect Amir. I remember meeting him once at a screening of Fat Bidin‘s Look-East film, and asked him about the ban on his film ‘Village People Radio Show‘. He wasn’t too thrilled about the ban, but was going to re-appeal. In the meantime, Singapore was kind enough to not give two cents about banning a film that their brothers across the causeway had made noise over, so Amir was looking forward to the day the film opened there.

(I saw stills and a few clips of the interviews done for ‘Village People Radio Show‘. Just like any other documentary, stories from the survivors’ perspective. Nothing to ‘corrupt’ the young minds of this country today, I must say – so why the fuss?)

Back to the original topic  – does anyone really remember the 20th of September in 1998? I sure as hell don’t. I was only 18 then, and if I’m not mistaken, was getting ready to be utterly pissed drunk and smashed at a friend’s birthday celebration that night.

Years later, when I think back, I realize that the reason I didn’t remember what happened to the country was because I was afraid. Back then, if you even so much as uttered a word about what had happened – you wouldn’t know if the person around you was for the issue, or against it.

I remember a close friend of mine, Edzral, who months later came back from Uni (somewhere in Kelantan or Terengganu) for the holidays, and told me how he had joined the Youth group of Keadilan in the Uni.

I flatly told him that I valued our friendship more than anything else in the world – and told him that we would both keep our opinions of the whole issue to ourselves and never bring it up in a conversation ever.

Not because I was for or against what had happened (and neither am I even taking sides now, preferring to not give a damn). But because I didn’t want him getting arrested (it was a very sensitive time then), or me getting into trouble for discussing such things.

Now that times have changed, and with the wide use of the Internet; people have changed too. Sometimes not for the better, but at least, with a more open-mind.

So, I rise up my glass (of water, sadly I don’t try to get intoxicated anymore) to Amir for constantly trying to bring the truth to his films,  and for always pushing the limits. There are few local filmmakers out there who can safely attest to the fact that they are not governed by the sensitivities of the Censorship board, but bound by their art.

So, Jasdevism, when’s your turn?

Here’s some interesting bits I dug out – what does the 20th of September mean to other people outside Malaysia?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/September_20

Wiki has an paragraph about that special day in Malaysia :

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malaysian_politics